Desserts

My Inconvenient Truth: ELT (Eggplant, Tomato & Lettuce)

Egglant, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich

I think about the cost of convenience every day. Whether it’s preparing a healthy plant-based meal at home or eating at a vegan restaurant, the cost of convenience is apparent. I could use frozen vegetables to make meal preparation easier and less expensive, but I prefer to use fresh vegetables because they have a better taste and texture. While going out to eat is convenient, there is a price to pay in the form of limited choices and the presence of added oil and salt. I was reminded of this “inconvenient truth” last weekend as Bruce and I had lunch at a  “destination” vegan restaurant. (I use the term “destination” when we plan an entire outing around a restaurant.) Since we traveled about an hour to get there I wanted to make the most of our trip and decided to sample a few things on the menu. We ordered jackfruit stuffed mushrooms and oyster mushrooms in scampi sauce for appetizers. I had a French dip portobello mushroom sandwich and Bruce had an ELT (eggplant, lettuce and tomato sandwich). Each stuffed mushroom had a healthy dollop of vegan tartar sauce which I could tell contained oil. The scampi sauce was made with oil and/or vegan butter. The French dip had melted vegan mozzarella (oil), the ELT had fried eggplant and vegan mayo (more oil) and both sandwiches were served with a side of fries. The truth is we don’t eat oil anymore, and when we do it doesn’t sit right with us. I guess that’s the price we pay for the convenience of eating out. Anyway, the ELT was quite tasty and I was impelled to come up with an oil-free version at home. I made the eggplant by dipping the slices in aquafaba (the liquid from canned chickpeas), coating them with bread crumbs, then baking in the oven. Instead of vegan mayonnaise I mashed up an avocado with some lemon juice and a pinch of black salt. Wanting to keep it as close to a traditional BLT, I built the sandwich by spreading a layer of avocado “mayo” on toasted white bread then loading it up with the breaded eggplant, juicy tomato slices and crisp lettuce. The crispy coating on the eggplant gives the sandwich a crunchy mouth-feel that’s similar to bacon and the avocado lends a mayo-like creaminess — without the use of oil. (A few days later I re-crisped the left over eggplant in an air fryer which gave them more of a bacon mouth feel.) Well worth the effort. The truth is that, at times, it may be inconvenient to follow a plant-based diet, but it’s a price I’m willing to pay for tasty food that’s wholesome and healthy. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

ELT (Eggplant, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwiches)

Eggplant:

1 small eggplant (about 1 lb.), cut into 1/4 inch slices
½ cup bread crumbs
1 Tablespoon smoked paprika
1 Tablespoon brown sugar
salt & pepper to taste
½ cup or more of aquafaba (liquid from canned chick peas)

Preheat oven to 400F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine bread crumbs, paprika, brown sugar, salt and pepper in shallow dish. Place aquafaba in a bowl. Dip eggplant slices in aquafaba, then coat with bread crumbs. Place eggplant slices in a single layer on baking sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes until browned, turning occasionally. Remove from oven and serve immediately.

To make eggplant in an air fryer:

Place about 8 slices of eggplant in basket of air fryer, alternating each layer to allow more even browning and to prevent them from sticking together. Fry at 350F for 20 to 25 minutes. About half way through cooking, gingerly rearrange the slices and continue cooking until browned.
For the Avocado “Mayo”:

1 ripe avocado
½ teaspoon lemon juice
Pinch of black salt (or regular table salt)

For the Sandwiches:

Your favorite sandwich bread
Sliced tomatoes
Lettuce

Toast two slices of bread. Spread some avocado “mayo” on one slice, then arrange four slices of eggplant, two or three slices of tomatoes and some lettuce.

23 May 2017

Impulse Buying: Air-Fried Zucchini Sticks

Zucchini Sticks

I know I have a problem when it comes to kitchen equipment, so I really try to avoid “impulse purchases”. I consider how much I will use it, how much space it will take up and if it will just end up on the Island of Misfit Toys (i.e. my basement). Once I decide to add another appliance to my arsenal, I usually read as many reviews and compare costs to make sure I’m getting the best one to suit my needs. I happened to be shopping for waste baskets at Bed, Bath and Beyond and thought I’d just “check out” what they had in the way of air fryers. Right on the top shelf was one made by Phillips.What really made it stand out was the face of Gordon Ramsey plastered on the box. He usually wears a scowl, so I figured this must be a good piece of equipment if he’s smiling about it. The air fryer already had a hefty markdown, and combined with my 20% coupon and Chef Ramsey’s endorsement I decided to bring this baby home. I’m happy I did. So far, I’ve made French fries, sweet potato fries, glazed tofu and these Breaded Zucchini Sticks — all without one drop of oil. The air fryer is so easy to use and clean. Just load up whatever you’re “frying” into the basket then set the temperature and timer. The only other thing you need to do is shake up the basket half way through. That’s it! For this recipe, I simply dipped the zucchini sticks in aquafaba (the liquid from canned chick peas) then coated them with seasoned bread crumbs. I “fryed” them at 350F for 25 minutes. To my surprise the coating did not fall off the surface and “fryed” up nice and crisp. If you don’t have or want to buy an air fryer, you can bake the zucchini in the oven. I served the zucchini sticks with some left-over red pepper sauce I had in the fridge, but I would probably just use some marinara sauce the next time I make these. The only impulse I have now is to create more recipes to make in my air fryer. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Breaded Zucchini Sticks

1 zucchini squash (about 1 lb.), cut into ½” thick sticks
½ cup bread crumbs
1 teaspoon oregano or other herb
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
¼ teaspoon tomato powder (optional)
Aquafaba (liquid from canned chick peas)

Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine bread crumbs, oregano, garlic powder and tomato powder in shallow dish. Place aquafaba in a bowl. Dip zucchini sticks in aquafaba, then coat with bread crumbs. Place zucchini sticks in a single layer on baking sheet.

To cook in an air fryer:

Place zucchini sticks in basket of air fryer, alternating each layer to allow more even browning and to prevent them from sticking together. Fry at 350F for 20 to 25 minutes. About half way through cooking, gingerly rearrange the zucchini sticks and continue cooking.

To bake in an oven:

Preheat oven to 400F. Bake for about 20 minutes until browned, turning occasionally. Remove from oven and serve immediately.

08 May 2017

Madness to My Method: Mint-Chocolate Smoothie

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

There’s a saying that goes “there’s a method to my madness” which means that there is purpose in what one is doing, even though it seems to be crazy. Today’s post is a peek into how my mind works, which I like to think of as the “madness to my method.” A recipe for a mint chocolate chip smoothie popped up on one of my Facebook groups a few weeks ago and it stirred up memories from when I was making my own dairy ice cream. Mint chocolate chip was one of my favorite flavors. Boy, could I go for some right now. So, the recipe that inspired my latest obsession contained fresh mint for flavor and a handful of spinach for color. I don’t know about you, but milk and spinach doesn’t do it for me. One of the first things I discovered about home-made mint ice cream, unlike most commercial ones, is that it’s not green. My approach was to create a smoothie that had a hint of mint and an ice cream-like feeling. I tried a version using frozen peas for what I thought would add a creamy thickness. (Yuk!) I tried using sweet rice as a thickener. I had to soak the rice overnight and steam it the next day, which proved to be too much advance planning for a smoothie. This also resulted in a more “gooey” and less creamy consistency. The chocolate chips were another problem. If I blended them with the other ingredients, they disappeared. When I added them in during the last few seconds they sunk to the bottom of the glass.The flavor of the fresh mint fell flat, so I sent away for a bottle of pure mint extract and put the testing on hold for a few days. While waiting for my shipment to arrive I couldn’t stop thinking about this recipe. What if . . . I just added the mint extract to my go-to cinnamon bun smoothie? What if . . .  I used brown rice instead of sweet rice? What if . . .  I just start from scratch? And the chocolate . . . what if I shave it and stir it in when ready to serve? By the time the extract arrived, I had it sorted out: almond milk, banana, dates, brown rice, oatmeal, mint extract and chocolate shavings. I tend to over-blend my smoothies to get them extra creamy, but that also makes them warm. I find that refrigerating them for a few hours allows the milk to absorb the starch from the oats and rice making for a thicker smoothie. A thicker smoothie helps the chocolate shavings maintain their buoyancy. All of this obsessing paid off with a Mad Good Mint Chocolate Smoothie that’s smooth, creamy, slightly sweet with a tinge of mint and specked with chocolate. Mix up your own batch of blissful madness today. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

Makes one or two servings

1-½ cups almond milk
1 large frozen banana, sliced
¼ cup old fashioned oats
¼ cup cooked brown rice
4 pitted dates
1/8 teaspoon mint extract
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
Shaved chocolate

Combine all of the ingredients, except the shaved chocolate, in a high-speed blender and process until smooth. Pour into a glass and stir in shaved chocolate. If you would like a thicker smoothie you can place in the refrigerator for a few hours.

05 Apr 2017

Oh, My Darlings: Pistachio-Date Nests

Pistachio-Date Nest

I wanted to come up with a dessert recipe to go along with a Mediterranean-inspired Valentine’s Day dinner and the first thing that came to mind was Baklava. Baklava is made by layering phyllo leaves, brushing the layers with butter, sprinkling them with walnuts (Greek style) or pistachios (Turkish style) and pouring honey over everything when it comes out of the oven. I didn’t think a vegan version would do this iconic dessert much justice, so I incorporated some beneficial ingredients (pistachios and dates), left out the “taboo” ones (butter and honey), added some chocolate (hey, it’s Valentine’s Day) and named them “Pistachio-Date Nests.” I used Athen’s Mini Fillo Shells because they’re ready to fill and are very cute. The filling is made by processing dates, pistachios and lemon or orange zest into a paste. A thin layer of dark chocolate adorns the top. They’re crispy, chewy, chocolately . . .  and cute. Be a darling and share some Pistachio-Date Nests with someone you love. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Pistachio Date Nests

15 mini phyllo cups (Athens fully baked, fill & serve)
½ cup raw, shelled pistachios
½ cup dates, chopped
Zest of one lemon or ½ orange
2 oz. melted dark chocolate (non-dairy)
15 pistachios for decorating

Place pistachios and dates in mini chopper and process until a chunky paste is formed. Fold in lemon zest. Lightly press the filling into the phyllo cups. Spread the melted chocolate on surface of filling and place one pistachio on top. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

11 Feb 2017

Whole Latte Love: Chia Latte Pudding

Chia Latte Pudding

Valentine’s Day originated as a saint day honoring one or more saints named Valentine. Through the centuries it has turned into a celebration of romantic, or “courtly”, love. We have romantic dinners, drink champagne and indulge in all things chocolate. I wanted to come up with a decadent-tasting dessert that you could enjoy even if you didn’t leave room for it. I think I pulled it off with this Chia Latte Pudding. The base is a chocolate chia pudding that’s sweetened with dates and maple syrup. The chocolate flavor is deepened by the addition of instant espresso. The light and creamy topping is made with silken tofu, dates and bananas. Keep it cozy by serving the pudding in an old-fashioned glass; or make an elegant presentation in a vintage champagne coupe. This Latte Chia Pudding looks elegant, tastes decadent and is simple and healthy enough to enjoy on a regular basis. Why wait until February 14th when you can celebrate love and dessert every day of the year? Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Latte Chia Pudding

Latte Topping:

12 oz. soft silken tofu
6 dates
1 ripe banana
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Mocha Pudding:

2 cups almond milk
½ cup chia seeds, processed into powder
12 dates
½ cup cocoa powder (extra dark, if possible)
¼ cup maple syrup
1 Tablespoon instant coffee (if using instant expresso, use less)

shaved non-dairy chocolate and cinnamon for garnish

Place silken tofu, 6 dates, banana and vanilla into blender container. Process on high until super smooth. Pour into a 3-cup container, cover and refrigerate until set.

Measure chia seeds into coffee grinder and process until finely ground. Place ground chia, milk, dates, cocoa powder, maple syrup and espresso powder in blender container. Blend until smooth. Pour into a 4-cup container, cover and refrigerate until set.

To assemble:

Spoon mocha pudding into a parfait glass or other dessert cup. Top with a dollop of latte topping, then sprinkle with cinnamon and shaved chocolate. The ratio should be about two parts of mocha pudding to one part of the latte topping.

04 Feb 2017

Oh, What Fun: Buche de Noel

Buche de Noel, or Yule Log Cake, is a traditional dessert served at holiday time. The traditional recipe consists of a thin sponge cake that’s filled with raspberry jam, rolled up and decorated with chocolate icing to resemble a log. Through the years, other variations have been created that include chocolate cake, ganache and icings flavored with liqueurs. Since the Buche de Noel has turned into an “anything goes” recipe, I thought I might try my hand at a healthy, plant-based version. I used whipped aquafaba (the liquid from cooked chickpeas) to achieve a sponge-like consistency in the cake. The filling is made with silken tofu, non-dairy dark chocolate and dates. I wanted to use toasted hazelnuts and Frangelico liqueur for the cake, but I ended up using almonds and almond extract because that’s what I had on hand. If you prefer desserts that are not too sweet, you can omit the dates from the frosting. I dusted the top with some confectioner’s sugar. If you want to stick with tradition and decorate the outside to look like a yule log, you will have to double the frosting recipe. What I love about this recipe is that you can make different versions by using fruit filling, grated orange rind, different liqueurs or nuts or adding crushed candy to the frosting. Oh what fun you’ll have making and eating this beautiful Buche de Noel. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Buche de Noel

6 tablespoons aquafaba
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/8 teaspoon xanthan gum

1 cup sugar
2/3 cup pumpkin

½ cup (all-purpose or whole wheat pastry)
½ cup cocoa powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt

1 cup chopped nuts (optional)
Powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375F. Line an 11×15” rimmed baking sheet (jelly roll pan) with parchment and lightly grease the sides of the pan.

Place aquafaba and cream of tartar in mixing bowl. Using hand-held mixer, beat until soft peaks form. Add xanthan gum and continue beating until stiff peaks form.

Whisk together the sugar and pumpkin in a small bowl.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt. Add the pumpkin mixture to the dry and mix well. Gently fold in the whipped aquafaba.

Spread evenly into prepared baking pan and sprinkle nuts on surface. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes until a knife comes out clean when inserted into center of cake. Remove and let cool a few minutes. (The cake needs to be warm in order to get it to roll up.) Place a clean baking towel on an un-rimmed baking sheet and sprinkle with powdered sugar. Carefully invert cake on top of towel, then roll up. Let cool completely before filling.

Chocolate-Date Frosting

½ cup dates
12 oz. extra firm silken tofu
4 oz. non-dairy dark chocolate, melted
1 tsp. vanilla extract

Pour boiling water over dates and let soak about one hour to soften. Place dates and remaining ingredients in container of a high-powered blender and process until smooth. Refrigerate until thoroughly cooled.

Buche de Noel

17 Dec 2016

Make It Merry: Stroopwafel

Stroopwafel

Stroopwafel

I suspect that most folks go to the liquor store just to “run in” and pick up a bottle or a six pack. Not me. There’s a local store that offers wine tastings on the weekends, so when I go I set aside an hour of my time and make it an event. On a recent shopping trip/wine tasting, I sampled a liqueur calledStroopwafel”. They even offered samples of the cookie that was the inspiration for the beverage. A stroopwafel (literally “syrup waffle”) is a waffle made from two thin layers of baked dough with a caramel-like syrup filling in the middle.It is popular in the Netherlands, where they were first made in the city of Gouda.The cookie is placed on top of a hot cup of coffee or tea so that the caramel softens. Before I stepped away from the tasting table I was already conjuring up this recipe in my head.(I also saw myself sitting by the fire warming my hands around a hot cup of spiked coffee and enjoying a crisp and gooey Stroopwafel.) I’ve made pizzelles before, so all I had to do was come up with a caramel filling. I recalled seeing a recipe for a vegan caramel sauce a few months ago that might work. (I can’t find the original source, so I apologize for not being able to give credit where credit is due.) The original recipe used a combination of oat milk and non-dairy yogurt, but I’ve had success using soy creamer. The recipe looks daunting, but it’s actually quite easy and fun to make. And when you’re done, you can put your feet up and enjoy a hot cup of coffee topped off with a warm Stroopwafel. To make it even merrier you might as well add a splash of the liqueur to your coffee. Make It Merry and make it a Vegi-curious day.

Stroopwafel

You will need a pizzelle maker to make the wafers and a candy thermometer for the caramel.

For the wafers:

1 cup all-purpose flour (whole wheat pastry flour)
1 tablespoon flax meal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup almond milk, warmed to room temperature
1 tablespoon flax meal
1/2 cup pumpkin purée
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons melted unrefined coconut oil

Whisk the flour and salt together in a large mixing bowl.

Place milk and flax meal in container of blender and let it sit a few minutes. Add pumpkin, brown sugar, coconut oil and process until smooth.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients in the mixing bowl and mix them until the batter is totally smooth. The batter should be the consistency of thick pancake batter.

Heat a pizzelle maker according to manufacturer’s directions. Place 1 rounded teaspoon (I like to use a melon ball scoop) of batter on pizzelle maker, close cover and grill until golden (about 1-1/2 minutes). You want the wafers to be a little bigger than the size of your coffee cups. Remove to cooling rack to cool completely.

For the caramel:

¾ cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons of water
5 tablespoons of soy creamer
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract or butterscotch liqueur

Note: The caramel will bubble fiercely when the creamer is added to the sugar syrup, so you must use a pot deep enough to prevent the caramel from boiling over and be careful to not get burned.

Place the sugar and water into a deep pot and cook over medium-high heat until the sugar melts and turns a light amber color (355F). Remove from stove and add the creamer, stirring vigorously being careful not to get burned by the bubbling caramel. Let cool just enough to either spread or dip the wafers. The caramel can be re-warmed in the microwave (about 5 seconds at a time) if it gets to thick to spread.

Assembly:

Place a cooling rack inside of a rimmed baking sheet. Take one wafer and dip it into the warm caramel. Place another wafer on top and place on cooling rack. You could alternately use a small spatula to spread the caramel on the wafers. You might run out of caramel before using up all of the pizzelle. You should get about 16 Stroopwafels.

02 Dec 2016

We Have No Bananas: Baked Plantains

Baked Plantains for Almond Milk Yogurt

Baked Plantains for Almond Milk Yogurt

Plantain — is it a fruit or a vegetable? Technically, it’s part of the genus Musa, which also contains bananas. However, plantains are starchier than bananas and not as sweet. A staple in Central and South America and the Caribbean, a popular way to serve plantains is as side dish of fried tostones or maduras. I’ve had them prepared this way once or twice. It’s basically a sponge for oil. Plantains have several health benefits as they are high in fiber and contain potassium; vitamins A, C, B and the minerals iron, magnesium, and phosphorous. Why ruin a good thing by cooking them in oil? Well, you don’t have to. Bruce learned about this method of baking plantains from Chef Ramses Bravo at the True North Health Center. It’s as easy as:

One: Buy a few plantains and let them ripen until the skin is completely black. You can start off with whatever shade is available — green (least ripe); yellow (almost ripe); black (ripe and ready).

Two: Place on a rimmed baking sheet or a piece of aluminum foil with it’s edges turned up. (You’ll want to catch every gooey drop of plantain syrup that oozes from the plantain.) Bake at 350F until the skin splits open (see picture below), about 15 minutes.

Three: When the skin splits and the contents start to bust out, remove the plantains from the oven and enjoy as is.

Baked Plantain

Baked Plantain

If  you’re looking to “complicate” your meal prep, you can top off your baked plantain with some non-dairy yogurt and granola as a breakfast treat; enjoy it as a dessert with chia pudding; or serve it alongside your favorite bean burger.

So healthy, so sweet and so simple. You have no bananas? Then try baking some plantains today. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

02 Oct 2016

Vegi-curious Adventures: Plant-Based Guide to Quebec City

Berries at Marche Vieux-Port

Berries at Marche Vieux-Port

Bruce and I spent our honeymoon in Quebec City 15 years ago. We got married at the end of July and wanted to go someplace where we could hold hands without sticking to one another. I was thinking that a train ride across Canada would be romantically fun. Thankfully, our travel agent talked us into going to Quebec City. We loved it and have been back so many times that I lost count. This year is the first time we would travel to Quebec City as herbivores and were somewhat apprehensive about the food. Quebecois cuisine is very French and very meat-centric with elk, caribou, wapiti, fois gras, lobster, duck, cheese, cream and butter making regular appearances on the menus at our favorite restaurants. One interesting aspect about Quebec City is that there always seems to be an abundance of fresh produce at the Marche du Vieux-Port, so we figured we could rely on that if we got desperate. We decided to throw apprehension to the wind and made our reservations.

In preparation for the long drive, I packed up some oatmeal-apple muffins (recipe at the bottom of this post) and hummus with veggies and pita crisps. I figured it would be wise to eat as cleanly as possible to offset any lapses we might have once we set foot in Quebec. We were so exhausted and hungry by the time we arrived that we walked to the closest sushi bar for dinner. (You can always rely on vegetable sushi in a pinch just about anywhere you travel.)

We fueled up for our daily walking excursions at the hotel’s breakfast buffet. First, a plate of mixed greens, dried fruit, nuts and seeds; then on to fresh melon, pineapple, bananas and kiwis; followed by raisin or multi-grain toast with peanut butter or a variety of local berry preserves. Every other day they would put out tasty little almond bars. I resolved to make a plant-based version upon our return and will post that very soon.

Quebec City is the only walled city in North America. A typical day was to walk within the walls, then down to lower Quebec and along the water. Many of the stores sell products that are made in the Province of Quebec and it’s a great way to check out the menus for dinner. Some days we would walk around the Citadel, the Plains of Abraham or the Grand Allee. We made it to Quebec City just in time to catch the last day of the Plein Arts festival on the waterfront and the first day of the Fete de Biere (brew fest). We planned our walks so as to stop at the Marche du Vieux-Port to pick up lunch. The Marche du Vieux-Port is a farmers’ market near the Bassin Louise. All of the produce vendors sell berries from the I’le de Orleans. (I’ll write about this lovely island in a separate post.) I found tasty prepared food at La Tomaterie. Their quinoa, couscous and bean salads were a staple for our lunches and the Tarte Vegetarien was a special treat. Local vineyards offer tastings of their wines that are also available for purchase. With a shopping bag full of goodness, we’d head up the hill to our hotel for a well-deserved lunch and afternoon nap.

Bean Salad & Couscous Salad

Bean Salad & Couscous Salad

Tarte Vegetarien

Tarte Vegetarien

In  my next post, I will share our favorite restaurants and the most memorable meal of our Quebec City vacation. You won’t want to miss it, so be sure to check back. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Apple & Oatmeal Muffin

Apple & Oatmeal Muffin

Apple-Oatmeal Muffins

Makes 18 muffins

Notes: the muffins are a little sweet, so you might want to adjust the amount of dates and/or maple syrup. If the apples have a lot of juice, you can either squeeze out the excess or reduce the amount of aquafaba or water.

1 cup whole oats
1 cup brown rice flour or whole wheat pastry flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
¼ teaspoon salt

¾ to1 cup dates
¼ cup almond butter
½ cup non-dairy milk
¼ to ½ cup maple syrup
6 tablespoons aquafaba or water
1 tablespoon flax meal
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 cups grated apples
1 cup walnuts, chopped
½ cup raisins

Preheat oven to 350F. Place cupcake liners into muffin pan.

In a large bowl whisk together oats, flour, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. In food processor, combine dates, almond butter, milk, syrup, aquafaba, flax meal and vanilla. Add in apples and walnuts and stir to combine

Using a large ice cream scoop, fill liners ¾ the way full. Bake for 20 minutes.

23 Aug 2016

Not Sharing: No Pudge Brownie Sundae

Brownie Sundae

Brownie Sundae

Hot Fudge Brownie Sundaes appear on so many restaurant menus here in the States that they’re almost as American as apple pie. They’re usually made with a warm brownie, a scoop of ice cream, hot fudge sauce and whipped cream. Imagine eating that after a big meal. Like many other “health-conscience” restaurant goers, I often shared a brownie sundae with my friends. Even after sharing, I still left the restaurant feeling a bit “pudgy” and a little sick to my stomach. I threw together this version of a Hot Fudge Brownie Sundae last night. I just returned from a trip to Kansas and the cupboard was bare. I happened to have a few frozen bananas, strawberries and chick pea brownies in the freezer. I made a quick fudge sauce by melting dark chocolate with soy creamer. I processed the bananas and strawberries in my Blendtec blender and warmed the brownies in the microwave. The sundae was decadent in a delightful way. There was a nice contrast of sweet from the chocolate and tart from the strawberries; warmth from the hot fudge and brownie and cold from the ice “cream”. This No Pudge Brownie Sundae is full of good things that won’t weigh you down so you might not feel the need to share. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

No Pudge Brownie Sundae

  • 1 frozen banana, sliced
  • 10 frozen strawberries (about 1 cup)
  • 4 squares of chocolate
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons soy creamer or non-dairy milk

Fill a small pot with a few inches of water. Place a small metal bowl on top and add chocolate and creamer. Heat until chocolate is melted. Remove from heat.

Process bananas and strawberries in a high-powered blender until thick and creamy. If it gets too soft, place in freezer for a few minutes.

Heat brownies in microwave until warm. (I usually microwave on 30% power for 1 to 2 minutes. Place a scoop of ice “cream” on top of brownie and pour hot fudge sauce on top.

 

11 Aug 2016

%d bloggers like this: