Tag Archives: non-dairy

Imagine This: Chunky Monkey Waffles

Chunky Monkey Waffles

One of the first plant-based recipe books I ever bought is The Forks Over Knives Cookbook. Second to their Broccoli and Peanut Noodles recipe I’ve made their Chunky Monkey Smoothie most often. The smoothie contains almond milk, cocoa powder, peanut butter and dates. Very simple and healthy. This morning I wanted to have pancakes for breakfast but didn’t feel like making a fuss or a big mess. So I went to the freezer and got the next best thing to pancakes — a box of Trader Joe’s vegan waffles. Last week I came up with a “cheater” blueberry syrup and wondered how I could top that. It started by layering chopped bananas between the waffles. Hmmmmm . . . if there are two things that go nicely with bananas it’s chocolate and peanut butter. I mixed together pure maple syrup with chunky peanut butter and cocoa powder, warmed it in the microwave and poured it over the banana and waffle stack. (The ratio went something like this: two parts syrup, one part peanut butter and one part cocoa powder.)  I placed a strawberry on top just for fun which got me to thinking that this would be nice with strawberries in place of the bananas. What about other fruit? Pears would nice with a chocolate-almond butter sauce and sprinkled with toasted almonds. Peaches might be nice with chocolate and hazelnuts. You can switch up your sauce by using different spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, pumpkin pie spice or even chili powder. So while I have no recipe to offer you today I can give you some guidance sprinkled with a spoonful of imagination. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

11 Mar 2018

Trial & Error: Banana Pancakes with Blueberry Syrup

Banana Pancakes & Blueberry Syrup

The other day I experimented with my pumpkin pancake recipe and decided to replace all of the whole wheat pastry flour with oat flour. Luckily I had already eaten breakfast because the pancakes were less than awesome. They took what seemed like forever to cook and were still gummy on the inside. I don’t know about you, but I like my pancakes on the fluffy side. It would be nice to understand how different flours perform in baked goods, but I probably need to go to culinary arts school to learn about that. For now, it’s just trial and error.

I was still on a pancake kick and went back to basics, this time with some over-ripe bananas I had hanging out the fridge. I used whole wheat pastry flour, but you can use all-purpose or whole wheat flour if you like. I’ve found that the presence of fat in baked goods improves the texture, so I used canola oil in this recipe. You can substitute it with almond butter or simply eliminate the oil altogether. If the bananas are very sweet you can even omit the sugar. Rather than adding blueberries to the batter, I made a “cheater” blueberry syrup by mixing maple syrup with Trader Joe’s Reduced Sugar Blueberry Preserves. These pancakes came out thick, light and tender and the blueberry syrup added the right amount of sweetness to the stack. Try these Banana Pancakes and you can’t go wrong. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Banana Pancakes

Makes 12 to 16 pancakes

2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
2 Tablespoons sugar (optional)
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon nutmeg
2 cups non-dairy milk
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar (optional)
2 large over-ripe bananas
2 tablespoons flax meal
1 Tablespoon almond butter or canola oil

Whisk the flour, baking soda, sugar, salt, and nutmeg together in a large mixing bowl.

Grease a non-stick griddle with canola oil and over medium heat. Alternately, heat an electric griddle on high (I don’t grease mine).

Place milk, vinegar, bananas, flax meal and almond butter or canola oil in blender and process until smooth.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix them until the batter is totally smooth.

Use a ladle to portion the batter onto your griddle. Once you see bubbles at the top of your pancakes and their edges begin to turn golden, they’re ready to flip. Flip the pancakes and allow them to cook for a few minutes on the other side.

Serve the pancakes with maple syrup or fruit topping.

“Cheater” Blueberry Syrup: for every tablespoon of blueberry preserves, use two tablespoons of maple syrup

 

03 Mar 2018

Don’t Toss That Pumpkin: Punkin’ Chunkin’ Topping

Yogurt Pumpkin Parfait

It’s funny how a recipe can remind me of something totally unrelated to food, which leads me to how I came up with Punkin’ Chunkin’ Topping as the name for this recipe. When we first moved to Delaware our neighbor told us about the Punkin’ Chunkin’ Competition that was held every fall. People would design large catapult or sling-shot devises that would propel pumpkins through the air. The team that launched the farthest was the winner. Last year a woman suffered a serious (but thankfully not life-threatening) head injury after being hit by a flying pumpkin and that was the end of any punkin’ chunkin’ in Delaware. Today’s recipe was prompted by some pumpkins on our back porch that managed to survive the first frost. I figured I should use them up before they start to turn soft. I thought about Thanksgiving and pumpkin pie with whipped cream. Wouldn’t it be nice to have that for breakfast? Since I always have homemade soy yogurt on hand I would use that, laced with pumpkin butter, as the “creamy” element of this recipe. For the topping I cooked pumpkin cubes with brown sugar and pumpkin pie spice in a non-stick skillet. The result was slightly sweet, delicately spiced chunks of pumpkin. Yes! You can can have pumpkin pie for breakfast. It’s even yummy enough to serve as dessert. So, don’t toss that pumpkin from your porch; use it to cook up some Punkin’ Chunkin’ Topping for yogurt, puddings or frozen desserts. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Pumpkin Topping for Yogurt

1 baby pumpkin (about 8” diameter)
¼ to ½ cup brown sugar
Pumpkin pie spice to taste

If using a larger pumpkin, measure out about 4 cups of pumpkin cubes.

Cut the pumpkin in half and remove seeds. Peel the skin. Cut the pumpkin into 1” cubes. Place in a large non-stick skillet and toss with brown sugar and pumpkin pie spice. Cook the pumpkin on medium-high heat until tender, adding water as needed to prevent sticking. You can turn the heat on high for a few minutes to caramelize the pumpkin. Let cool to room temperature and serve over non-dairy yogurt or frozen dessert

 

 

03 Dec 2017

Kitchen Kids: Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowl

Breakfast Quinoa Bowl

Like many first-born children, my oldest brother, Tom, was very independent. I remember Mom telling the story of waking up one morning to find him making breakfast on the stove. He was about five years old. Luckily there was no harm done. I remember during my brief stint as a high school Home Economics teacher having my students make pancakes. It was a mess. After that experience, I’m not so sure I’d trust a five-year old in the kitchen. All kidding aside, there are some recipes that children can tackle under the watchful eye of Mom or Dad. My Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowl is one of them.

I was in the mood for rice pudding this morning. What I like about rice pudding is that it’s creamy, sweet and sultry all at the same time. I also woke up very hungry today and didn’t want to wait for a pot of rice to cook. I happened to make a batch of quinoa for dinner last night that was idling in the fridge. This was starting to sound interesting . . . creamy, sweet, sultry and . . . nutty. Why not? I added some quinoa, soy milk, sugar, arrowroot, vanilla and cinnamon into a ramekin and cooked it in the microwave for about 1-1/2 minutes. I added the arrowroot to help thicken the milk and give it that “pudding” mouthfeel. I had some cooked apples and raisins in the fridge and decided to spoon that over the pudding just before serving.  Some chopped banana or mango would be a nice addition as well. This was so simple to make that I just might trust a five-year old to make this. (Place the bowl on a plate before putting in the microwave and make sure they use oven mitts when removing it.) It is also so tasty that I trust your family will enjoy it. The nice thing is that it comes together so easily that you can make it as a quick weekday breakfast, a last-minute dessert or even a late-night snack. Make a few Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowls this morning and make it a Vegi-curious day!

Breakfast Quinoa Pudding

¼ cup cooked quinoa
2 Tablespoons non-dairy milk (see note)
½ teaspoon arrowroot or cornstarch
1 teaspoon sugar
Few drops of vanilla extract
Cinnamon
Favorite fruit for topping

Place all ingredients in a one-cup ramekin or bowl. Microwave on high for one minute. Remove and serve with chopped fruit.

Note: You can use more milk as desired. For every 2 tablespoons of milk, use ½ teaspoon of arrowroot and adjust sugar as you like.

09 Oct 2017

Sin-lessy Decadent: Hazelnut-Date Truffles

Hazelnut-Date Truffles

I love getting out of bed on Sunday mornings before anyone else wakes up. It’s my time for making lists, planning my week or simply clearing my head. This morning I’m sitting on our front porch enjoying some solitude and a lovely hydrangea whose blooms are turning to rust. And a cup of coffee. (Note to self: make it a point to spend more time out here.) It’s also the perfect time for me to share my recipe for these Hazelnut-Date Truffles that I made last week. I was in the mood for a decadent, chocolate treat that was easy to make using items I had in my pantry. I also wanted to keep the refined ingredients to a minimum to make these truffles as guilt-free as possible. Since my favorite chocolate candy is Perugina’s Baci (“little kisses” made with milk chocolate and hazelnuts) I decided to go with those flavors in mind. The truffle centers are made with hazelnuts, dates, cocoa powder and hazelnut liqueur. (I use my Blendtec Twister Jar in order to get a super silky texture.) I melted some dark chocolate with coconut cream for a glossy chocolate coating and rolled a few in cocoa powder. All I can say is WOW! The result was part truffle, part caramel, total decadence and no remorse. I paired the truffles with a glass of Frangelico liqueur, but a glass of red wine or port would also be nice. Treat yourself to these Hazelnut-Date Truffles and make it a Vegi-curious day.

Hazelnut-Date Truffles

½ cup dates
½ cup hazelnuts
2 Tbsp. regular or dark cocoa powder
1 Tbsp. Frangelico liqueur

2 oz. non-dairy dark chocolate
1 Tbsp. coconut cream or full fat coconut milk

Place dates, nuts, cocoa powder and liqueur in food processor or high-powered blender. Process until smooth. Remove and portion out into 1” balls. Place on parchment paper. Set aside

Melt the dark chocolate and coconut cream over low heat. Dip the truffles in the melted chocolate and place on parchment paper. (See note below.) Refrigerate until cooled.

Note: You could also roll the truffles in cocoa powder.

24 Sep 2017

Dessert for Breakfast? Apple Pie Ala Mode Yogurt

Apple Pie Ala Mode Yogurt

Who says you can’t have dessert for breakfast? When it’s soy yogurt and baked apples you can have dessert any time your heart (and yearnings) desire. I’m going to deviate from my routine of publishing a recipe and just share some ideas that hopefully will inspire you to create your own recipes.

I took two Gala apples, a handful of raisins and a sprinkling of brown sugar and cinnamon and cooked them in a non-stick skillet. If the apple variety you choose doesn’t let out too much liquid, you will want to add water a little at a time until the apples are soft but not mushy. Likewise, if you use a tart apple, like a Granny Smith, you might want to add more brown sugar. You can even omit the sugar if desired. When the apples are almost done I like to turn the heat up high to get them caramelized and syrupy. I spooned the warm apples over home-made soy yogurt and sprinkled some walnuts and granola on top. Two apples make enough for three to four servings of yogurt. If you want to make a larger quantity to enjoy all week long, I recommend baking the apples in the oven in a square or oblong glass baking pan. If you want to make your own soy yogurt, see my previous post. With all that goodness going on you can have dessert whenever you like. Now you can enjoy dessert for breakfast with this Apple Pie Ala Mode Yogurt. Thanks for being Vegi-curious day.

 

 

 

13 Sep 2017

Still Smokin’: Pasta Carbonara

Pasta Carbonara

This is a follow-up to my post on Smoked Shitake Mushrooms. The flavor of the smoked shitakes are so intense that a little goes a long way, so I’m still trying to come up with some recipes to use them up. I like to use cashew cream as a base for creamy pasta sauces and the smoked shitakes made me think of Pasta Carbonara. For this recipe I made a creamy sauce with raw cashews, tahini, lemon juice, garlic and a few smoked shitakes. (If you don’t want to smoke the shitakes, you can use liquid smoke.) I had about a half pound of cooked rigatoni pasta in the fridge that I “re-boiled” for 1 minute then added a cup of peas. I reserved some of the pasta water to thin out the sauce if needed. I stirred a few spoonfuls of the sauce into the pasta and peas. You can use as much or as little of the sauce as you like and add a few extra slivered smoked shitakes if you want a more smoky taste and some “meaty” texture. This dish came out creamy, smoky and oh, so yummy. It’s rich tasting, yet won’t weigh you down. This makes a nice meal to serve for a special occasion or you can make the sauce ahead of time and enjoy a decadent meal any night of the week. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Smoky Creamy Cashew Sauce

½ cup raw cashews, soaked and drained
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons tahini
1 Tablespoon nutritional yeast
1 garlic clove
A few slices of smoked shitake mushrooms
water

Process all ingredients in blender, adding more water to achieve desired consistency.

Use on potatoes, broccoli or other vegetables. Thin out and toss with cooked pasta.

08 Jul 2017

Remodeling: Mushroom Gyro Wrap

Mushroom Gyro Wrap

Long before adopting a plant-based diet one of my favorite sandwiches was a Greek Gyro. I started out ordering them with the “mystery” meat that’s sliced from a slab of lamb (and who knows what else) spinning around on a rotisserie. I migrated to Gyros made with grilled chicken breast thinking that was a healthier choice. Some time ago I remodeled my Gyro with this Greek mushroom and chickpea version of the “mystery” meat which is very tasty, but requires a small amount of effort. I wanted to come up with a newer model that was scaled back in terms of prep time and calories. My latest remodeled Gyro recipe has two key aspects that I wanted to replicate, one being the distinct flavor of marjoram, rosemary and garlic and the other being the creamy tang of Tzatzki sauce. I decided to grill some cremini mushrooms (I would have used portabellos if I had them) and seasoned them with garlic powder, marjoram and rosemary.  For the Tzatziki sauce I used a combination of raw cashews (for creaminess) and soy yogurt (for tanginess). I make my own since I don’t like what’s available in the stores near me, but you can use store-bought vegan sour cream or just plain soy yogurt to keep it simple. After grilling and seasoning the mushrooms, mixing up the Tzatziki, and slicing up the tomato, lettuce and onion, I took a pocket-less pita out of the freezer only to find that it was dried out and lost it’s ability to bend without breaking. Luckily, I had some fresh (and supple) flour tortillas on hand, which made for a lighter and neater wrap. With its Greek-inspired seasonings, mushroom “meatiness”, creamy Tzatziki sauce, onions, lettuce and tomatoes this wrap has everything I want in a Gyro. Start remodeling your life today by building yourself this healthy and delicious Mushroom Gyro Wrap. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Mushroom Gyro Wraps

Makes 6 to 8 wraps

Olive oil (optional)
1 lb. mushrooms, sliced (cremini or portabellos recommended)
dried marjoram, to taste
dried ground rosemary, to taste
garlic powder, to taste
Salt and black pepper to taste

Tzatziki Sauce (recipe follows)
Flour tortillas
Lettuce, chopped
Sliced tomatoes and onions

Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. (You can coat the skillet if desired.) Add mushrooms and cook until brown and most of liquid has evaporated. Season the mushrooms with marjoram, rosemary, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Remove from heat.

Tzatziki Sauce

1 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight
1 cup plain, non-dairy yogurt
1 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded and minced
Salt to taste
4 garlic cloves, finely minced
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar

Drain cashews and place in container of high-powered blender. Add just enough water to cover and process until smooth. Place into a small mixing bowl along with remaining ingredients and stir. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

To assemble Gyros:

Place a tortilla on piece of aluminum foil. Layer the lettuce, tomatoes, onions, mushrooms and Tzatziki sauce on tortilla. Roll up forming a conical-shaped wrap and secure with aluminum foil.

Mushroom Gyro

16 May 2017

Madness to My Method: Mint-Chocolate Smoothie

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

There’s a saying that goes “there’s a method to my madness” which means that there is purpose in what one is doing, even though it seems to be crazy. Today’s post is a peek into how my mind works, which I like to think of as the “madness to my method.” A recipe for a mint chocolate chip smoothie popped up on one of my Facebook groups a few weeks ago and it stirred up memories from when I was making my own dairy ice cream. Mint chocolate chip was one of my favorite flavors. Boy, could I go for some right now. So, the recipe that inspired my latest obsession contained fresh mint for flavor and a handful of spinach for color. I don’t know about you, but milk and spinach doesn’t do it for me. One of the first things I discovered about home-made mint ice cream, unlike most commercial ones, is that it’s not green. My approach was to create a smoothie that had a hint of mint and an ice cream-like feeling. I tried a version using frozen peas for what I thought would add a creamy thickness. (Yuk!) I tried using sweet rice as a thickener. I had to soak the rice overnight and steam it the next day, which proved to be too much advance planning for a smoothie. This also resulted in a more “gooey” and less creamy consistency. The chocolate chips were another problem. If I blended them with the other ingredients, they disappeared. When I added them in during the last few seconds they sunk to the bottom of the glass.The flavor of the fresh mint fell flat, so I sent away for a bottle of pure mint extract and put the testing on hold for a few days. While waiting for my shipment to arrive I couldn’t stop thinking about this recipe. What if . . . I just added the mint extract to my go-to cinnamon bun smoothie? What if . . .  I used brown rice instead of sweet rice? What if . . .  I just start from scratch? And the chocolate . . . what if I shave it and stir it in when ready to serve? By the time the extract arrived, I had it sorted out: almond milk, banana, dates, brown rice, oatmeal, mint extract and chocolate shavings. I tend to over-blend my smoothies to get them extra creamy, but that also makes them warm. I find that refrigerating them for a few hours allows the milk to absorb the starch from the oats and rice making for a thicker smoothie. A thicker smoothie helps the chocolate shavings maintain their buoyancy. All of this obsessing paid off with a Mad Good Mint Chocolate Smoothie that’s smooth, creamy, slightly sweet with a tinge of mint and specked with chocolate. Mix up your own batch of blissful madness today. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Mint Chocolate Smoothie

Makes one or two servings

1-½ cups almond milk
1 large frozen banana, sliced
¼ cup old fashioned oats
¼ cup cooked brown rice
4 pitted dates
1/8 teaspoon mint extract
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
Shaved chocolate

Combine all of the ingredients, except the shaved chocolate, in a high-speed blender and process until smooth. Pour into a glass and stir in shaved chocolate. If you would like a thicker smoothie you can place in the refrigerator for a few hours.

05 Apr 2017

Spinach-topia: Greek Spinach Pockets

Greek Spinach Pocket

Spanakopita is a popular Greek pie made with a spinach, onions and feta cheese filling and typically layered with sheets of phyllo. Even before I adopted a plant-based diet, I would eat Spanakopita on the rare occasion if someone else made it. A traditional recipe calls for cooking the spinach with olive oil then stirring in feta and eggs. Then the filling gets layered between sheets of phyllo that are brushed with butter. I really enjoyed it, but I certainly wouldn’t want a whole pan of it within easy reach. Lately, I’ve been on a Mediterranean food kick. I thought it would be nice to have a healthy, plant-based version of this tempting Greek specialty that doesn’t call for the use of phyllo. I made the filling by cooking spinach with onion, black salt (for an “eggy” taste), nutmeg and dill. I had some home-made almond milk ricotta on hand and mixed it with Kalamata olives to mimic the tang that’s characteristic of feta cheese. I opted to make individual servings by using frozen Roti. (Roti are Indian flat breads that can be found in the freezer section of an ethnic market. I’ve used Roti to make Jamaican Mushroom Patties , Broccoli Calzones and Samosadillas. They also make a nice accompaniment to Indian curry and dal recipes.) The end result? Well, let’s say I’m in “Spinach-topia.”  They came out nice and crisp on the outside and creamy and savory on the inside. We had them with a Greek-style tossed salad of Romaine lettuce, cherry tomatoes, Kalamata olives, oregano and red wine vinegar. You could also make smaller versions to serve as an appetizer or for a cocktail party. You can make and bake them ahead of time and re-crisp in the oven the next day. Grab a Greek Spinach Pocket and grab a little piece of heaven. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Greek Spinach Pockets

Makes about 8 to 10 pockets

Olive oil (optional)
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
20 oz. frozen chopped or cut spinach (do not defrost)
¼ tsp. black or regular salt
¼ tsp. nutmeg
1 Tablespoon dried dill

1 cup almond milk ricotta (or tofu-cashew ricotta)
¼ cup chopped Kalamata olives

Frozen Roti as needed

Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. (You may lightly coat the skillet with olive oil before heating.) Add onions and saute until they start to brown, adding water if needed to prevent sticking. Add frozen spinach and cook, uncovered, for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. The goal is to not allow the spinach to get watery. Add salt, nutmeg and dill and remove from heat. Let cool.

Add ricotta and olives to skillet and gently fold the ingredients together. Adjust seasonings as desired.

To assemble:

Preheat oven to 500F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.

Heat a non-stick electric griddle on high.* Place Roti on griddle and cook on one side. (The aim is to cook, but not brown the one side so the sufrace of the roti doesn’t get soggy when filled.) Place cooked side up onto baking sheet.** Spoon filling onto one half and fold the other side over, pressing edges together. Bake until crust has browned, flipping half way through baking. Remove and let cook about 5 minutes before serving.

*If you don’t have an electric griddle, you could heat a non-stick skillet on medium-high heat.

**For appetizer-sized pockets, cut the roti in half after cooking one side, fill and fold over to form a triangular-shaped pocket.

07 Mar 2017

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