Tag Archives: quinoa

Kitchen Kids: Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowl

Breakfast Quinoa Bowl

Like many first-born children, my oldest brother, Tom, was very independent. I remember Mom telling the story of waking up one morning to find him making breakfast on the stove. He was about five years old. Luckily there was no harm done. I remember during my brief stint as a high school Home Economics teacher having my students make pancakes. It was a mess. After that experience, I’m not so sure I’d trust a five-year old in the kitchen. All kidding aside, there are some recipes that children can tackle under the watchful eye of Mom or Dad. My Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowl is one of them.

I was in the mood for rice pudding this morning. What I like about rice pudding is that it’s creamy, sweet and sultry all at the same time. I also woke up very hungry today and didn’t want to wait for a pot of rice to cook. I happened to make a batch of quinoa for dinner last night that was idling in the fridge. This was starting to sound interesting . . . creamy, sweet, sultry and . . . nutty. Why not? I added some quinoa, soy milk, sugar, arrowroot, vanilla and cinnamon into a ramekin and cooked it in the microwave for about 1-1/2 minutes. I added the arrowroot to help thicken the milk and give it that “pudding” mouthfeel. I had some cooked apples and raisins in the fridge and decided to spoon that over the pudding just before serving.  Some chopped banana or mango would be a nice addition as well. This was so simple to make that I just might trust a five-year old to make this. (Place the bowl on a plate before putting in the microwave and make sure they use oven mitts when removing it.) It is also so tasty that I trust your family will enjoy it. The nice thing is that it comes together so easily that you can make it as a quick weekday breakfast, a last-minute dessert or even a late-night snack. Make a few Breakfast Quinoa Pudding Bowls this morning and make it a Vegi-curious day!

Breakfast Quinoa Pudding

¼ cup cooked quinoa
2 Tablespoons non-dairy milk (see note)
½ teaspoon arrowroot or cornstarch
1 teaspoon sugar
Few drops of vanilla extract
Cinnamon
Favorite fruit for topping

Place all ingredients in a one-cup ramekin or bowl. Microwave on high for one minute. Remove and serve with chopped fruit.

Note: You can use more milk as desired. For every 2 tablespoons of milk, use ½ teaspoon of arrowroot and adjust sugar as you like.

09 Oct 2017

Summer Camp: Broccoli & Quinoa Salad

Broccoli & Quinoa Salad with Peanut Dressing

Where did July go? Between a visit from family, vacation and tending to my exploding gardens, I had some time away from Vegi-curious. It was like being away at summer camp. And speaking of camps . . . there are two of them when it comes to soaking grains — the soakers and the non-soakers. I have always been on the side of the non-soakers. I really never gave much thought to it until recently. I read somewhere that Basmati rice comes out much better when soaked. I decided to do a test and cooked both soaked and un-soaked Basmati rice. I couldn’t tell the difference in taste or texture. My mother’s physical therapist is from India, so I figured he could shed some light on the subject. He said that in India they soak all grains because it makes them easier to digest. Since I don’t have a problem digesting grains and soaking requires advanced planning, I’m staying in the non-soaker camp . . . except when it comes to quinoa. Quinoa has a bitter coating that protects this grain from getting eaten by birds. Many recipes recommend to rinse the quinoa before cooking. Even with rinsing I hadn’t taken a liking to the taste of quinoa. I wondered if soaking the quinoa would help. I soaked the quinoa for 30 minutes then cooked it in my rice cooker. I couldn’t believe that the once bitter-tasting quinoa now had a mellow, nutty flavor to it. I was so excited and couldn’t wait to try out some quinoa recipes. I came up with this recipe for Broccoli & Quinoa Salad out of my need to make a meal early in the day that could be re-heated in the microwave or served at room temperature. I mixed the quinoa with steamed broccoli and raw carrots. It would have been nice to add some chopped scallions. I dressed it with an Asian-inspired peanut dressing, but a simple vinaigrette or mustard-based dressing would also be nice. Simple and tasty.I can’t say how good the leftovers were because we ate the whole thing that night.

Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Broccoli & Quinoa Salad with Peanut Dressing

1 cup quinoa, soaked for 30 minutes
1 large head of broccoli cut into small florets
1 large carrot, grated
Chopped Thai basil
Peanut dressing, below

Rinse and drain quinoa. Cook according to package directions.

Steam broccoli for 4 to 5 minutes and rinse under cold water. Place in large mixing bowl with carrots. Add the cooked quinoa to the bowl. Add the dressing and stir well. Garnish with Thai basil. Serve immediately.

Dressing:

¼ cup peanut butter
3 Tbsp. reduced sodium soy sauce
1 Tbsp. maple syrup
1 Tbsp. minced ginger root
1 garlic clove, minced
Juice from ½ lime
Crushed red pepper to taste

Place all ingredients in blender and process until smooth. You can choose to simply whisk the ingredients in a bowl if you like. Set aside.

03 Aug 2017

Don’t Fear the Fava: Asparagus & Fava Bean Salad

Asparagus & Fava Bean Salad with Quinoa

Ever since I saw “The Silence of the Lambs” many years ago, I’ve shied away from eating fava beans. It probably has something to do with Hannibal Lechter’s famous line that’s too gruesome to repeat on a food blog. A few months ago I mustered up the courage to buy a bag of dried, unpeeled fava beans. After soaking, peeling, boiling and then incorporating them into a recipe, I was left wondering what the fascination with fava beans was all about. This week’s CSA share included a bag of fresh fava beans. I peeled away the thick, spongy pod to reveal less than a cup of bright green beans. I boiled the beans for two minutes before peeling away the tough skin. A cup of fava beans is not enough to stand by themselves as the focal point of a meal, so I decided to use them in a salad with asparagus, green onions and a lemon-thyme dressing. The salad looked bright and pretty and tasted delicious. Yet, it didn’t look like it would make a substantial meal on its own. I wanted to add one other element that would round out the plate but not over-shadow the salad. My first thought was to add a grain. Farro has a nice texture and a nutty flavor, so I loaded up the steamer and waited. While the farro was cooking I thought that quinoa would make a nice pairing. As soon as the farro was finished, I steamed some quinoa. Both grains complemented the salad perfectly. I might also try serving the salad over fresh baby lettuce, arugula, spinach as an appetizer or side dish. I look forward to seeing more fava beans in my future. And If I don’t, I’ll just use fresh peas or lima beans instead. Thanks for being Vegi-curious.

Asparagus & Fava Bean Salad

Note: if fresh fava beans are not available, substitute cooked lima beans, green peas or additional asparagus.

1 lb. asparagus
1 cup fresh fava beans
4 green onions, thinly sliced
Lemon Thyme Dressing (recipe below)

Trim the tough bottoms from the asparagus. Cut into one-half inch pieces. Place in steamer basket set over water and steam for about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and rinse under cold water. Drain and place in shallow serving bowl.

Bring a small pot of water to boil. Add unpeeled fava beans and boil for two minutes. Remove from heat, rinse under cold water and drain. Remove and discard the skins. Place the peeled fava beans in the bowl with the asparagus. Add the green onions and lemon-thyme dressing to the bowl. Stir to combine. Adjust seasonings. Let marinate if time allows. Can be served cold or at room temperature.

Serve over greens, farro or quinoa.

Lemon Thyme Dressing

¼ cup fresh lemon juice
2 Tablespoons honey or brown rice syrup
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 small garlic clove, pressed
½ teaspoon dried thyme
Black pepper and salt to taste

Place all ingredients in glass measuring cup and whisk to combine.

 

31 May 2017

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